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Archiwum Medycyny Sądowej i Kryminologii

Concentrations of volatile substances in costal cartilage in relation to blood and urine – preliminary studies

Data publikacji: 01.10.2021

Archiwum Medycyny Sądowej i Kryminologii, 2021, Vol. 71 (1-2), s. 38 - 46

https://doi.org/10.5114/amsik.2021.106014

Autorzy

,
Marcin Tomsia
Department of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Toxicology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4668-4685 Orcid
Wszystkie publikacje autora →
,
Joanna Nowicka
Department of Physical Sciences and Forensic Science Programs, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA
Wszystkie publikacje autora →
,
Rafał Skowronek
Śląskie Centrum Chorób Serca w Zabrzu
Department of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Toxicology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1445-3807 Orcid
Wszystkie publikacje autora →
,
Gulnaz T. Javan
Department of Physical Sciences and Forensic Science Programs, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA
Wszystkie publikacje autora →
Elżbieta Chełmecka
Department of Statistics, Department of Instrumental Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Sosnowiec, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland
Wszystkie publikacje autora →

Abstrakt

Aim: The study aimed to examine whether volatile substances (ethanol, isopropanol, and acetone) can be detected in costal cartilage and also if concentrations of detected substances reliably reflect their concentrations in the peripheral blood – the standard forensic material for toxicological analyses. Such knowledge can be useful in cases when a cadaver’s blood is unavailable or contaminated.


Material and methods:
Ethanol, isopropanol, and acetone concentrations were determined in samples of unground costal cartilage (UCC), ground costal cartilage (GCC), femoral venous blood, and urine. The samples were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) with a flame ionization detector using headspace analysis.


Results
: Volatile substances were detected in 12 out of 100 analysed samples. There was a strong positive correlation between ethanol concentration in the blood and urine (r = 0.899, p < 0.001), UCC (r = 0.809, p < 0.01), and GCC (r = 0.749, p < 0.01). A similar strong correlation was found for isopropanol concentration in the blood and urine (r = 0.979, p < 0.001), UCC (r = 0.866, p < 0.001), and GCC (r = 0.942, p < 0.001). Acetone concentration in the blood strongly correlated only with its concentration in urine (r = 0.960, p < 0.001).


Conclusions:
We demonstrated for the first time the possibility of detecting volatile substances: ethanol, isopropanol and acetone in a human costal cartilage. Also, the study showed that higher volatiles concentrations were better determined in ground samples.

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Informacje

Informacje: Archiwum Medycyny Sądowej i Kryminologii, 2021, s. 38 - 46

Typ artykułu: Oryginalny artykuł naukowy

Tytuły:

Angielski:

Concentrations of volatile substances in costal cartilage in relation to blood and urine – preliminary studies

Autorzy

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4668-4685

Marcin Tomsia
Department of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Toxicology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4668-4685 Orcid
Wszystkie publikacje autora →

Department of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Toxicology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland

Department of Physical Sciences and Forensic Science Programs, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1445-3807

Rafał Skowronek
Śląskie Centrum Chorób Serca w Zabrzu
Department of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Toxicology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1445-3807 Orcid
Wszystkie publikacje autora →

Śląskie Centrum Chorób Serca w Zabrzu

Department of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Toxicology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland

Department of Physical Sciences and Forensic Science Programs, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA

Department of Statistics, Department of Instrumental Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Sosnowiec, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland

Publikacja: 01.10.2021

Otrzymano: 15.01.2021

Zaakceptowano: 04.03.2021

Status artykułu: Otwarte __T_UNLOCK

Licencja: CC-BY-NC-SA  ikona licencji

Udział procentowy autorów:

Marcin Tomsia (Autor) - 20%
Joanna Nowicka (Autor) - 20%
Rafał Skowronek (Autor) - 20%
Gulnaz T. Javan (Autor) - 20%
Elżbieta Chełmecka (Autor) - 20%

Korekty artykułu:

-

Języki publikacji:

Angielski

Liczba wyświetleń: 261

Liczba pobrań: 306